My Disney Top 5 - Walt Disney World Guest Mistakes

by Chris Barry, staff writer
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Welcome back to another Disney Top 5.

Walt Disney World guests are really a fascinating group of individuals, aren’t they? Without a doubt it’s as true a cross section of society as you’ll find anywhere. The Disney guest represents just about every socio-economic background. They come from all sorts of different places, and not just from this country but from all over the world. You’d be hard pressed to find a more diverse group of individuals vacationing anywhere. Times Square in New York City during the holidays would probably surpass Walt Disney World as far as packed and diverse crowds, but not by all that much.

With that big of a crowd, many of the people you run into at the Magic Kingdom and beyond are bound to be first-timers. A lot of them are doing just fine, but a lot of them need some help and guidance from us more experienced travelers. Once we’ve earned our Disney PhDs, it’s up to us to show new guests the way—and sometimes this is no easy task. People are sheep. I mean this as no insult to anyone. It’s just that…well…people are sheep. They follow the herd. It’s quite remarkable sometimes and not just at Disney. Sheep are everywhere.

How many times do I pull up to the main parking area at whatever beach I go to and see that everyone is crammed into the same space? Most of the time just a short, short distance away there’s a ton of room…but no one is there. The same goes for the ski slopes. My favorite mountain in Vermont just built a shiny new lift to the summit. It holds six people and has a Plexiglas door that closes over you. Granted, on windy days the door offers a nice respite from the cold. But even on sunny, warmer days I’ll watch hordes of people on that line ignore the older 4-person lift right next door. This was the main lift until the newer one was constructed. They both go to the same exact place and run at the same exact speed. But once the new one was built there’s never a line for the old one. All the sheep are waiting for the new, shiny, blue lift. Meanwhile I’m on the older lift getting to the top quicker than the hordes in the other line and getting more runs knocked out in the course of a day. It never fails.

I see the same sort of phenomenon happening at Walt Disney World whenever I’m there.  A lot of Disney vacationers do what they think they’re supposed to do. It seems they do a minimal amount of research and they just follow the herd. But here’s the thing – the herd doesn’t always know what they’re doing. Maybe some of them know a little bit, and they end up leading the herd down the path they think they’re supposed to be on, but that doesn’t make it the best or even the smartest path. Once you’ve “done Disney” enough times you know the way of the land and most importantly…you know what not to do. If you are anything like me, you’re hopefully doing the opposite of the herd—and all the wiser for doing so.

Sites like this one exist for inside tips on Disney travel and we’re more than happy to offer up our experience and expertise to get you, the reader, to break away from the herd. So with that said, here’s what I think are my Top 5 Walt Disney World Guest Mistakes.

5 – Most Guests Don’t Get an Early Start and Most Go to the Wrong Park on the Wrong Day.

This is an ironic one for me because I like to stay up late and I don’t particularly like to wake up early. However, we learned a long time ago that getting to a Disney park before it opens is the key to beginning a successful day. Get up early. Have a quick breakfast in the room or at your hotel and get moving. Keep in mind this does not …I repeat... does not mean following all the sheep to Morning Extra Magic Hour. For instance, if Epcot has an Extra Magic Hour in the morning, head to the Magic Kingdom, be there when it opens and get ready for a few hours of hopping right onto rides and attractions.


You can only see the wonderful Magic Kingdom Opening Ceremony if you get an early start. Photo by J. Jeff Kober.

There’s a small group of people in the know that will be there with you, but the bigger herd goes to the park with Extra Magic Hours and stays there all day. They’re in for a decent hour of shorter lines and then a whole day of crowds once the other herd arrives. This other herd has slept in and doesn’t get to the parks until 11:30 a.m. or so. They were getting there that late anyway regardless of which park it is. Now you’ve got all the people that slept in and all the people that thought they were getting ahead of things by going to Extra Magic Hours all crammed into the same park. You, on the other hand, will get to the non-Magic Hour Park when it opens and enjoy several hours of blissful sanity before the typical day crowd arrives. It’s always lighter. It’s always nicer. This strategy has never failed us and it perfectly segues into my next entry on this list.

4 – A Lot of Guests Don’t Take a Midday Break

This one ties into number five perfectly. We’re always amazed at the amount of people arriving at a Disney Park as we’re leaving to head back to our hotel and take a well-deserved rest. We’ve already had a fun filled morning and others are just getting there. We’re typically down there in the summer. The place to be around 1:00 p.m. or so in August is in the hotel pool or resting in an air-conditioned room.


The main pool at old Port Royale is just one of the right places to be midday. Photo by Chris Barry.

The place not to be is just arriving at a packed park. Huge crowds and the heat of the day will be there to greet you. Once again, get an early start and then get out midday for a break. You’ll be glad you did–and trust–me so will the little ones.

3 – Most Guests Leave The Parks in the Rain

In case no one tells you…it rains in Orlando in the summertime…just about everyday. You can practically set your clock on it. In the afternoon it will rain. Sometimes like jungle, topical, pouring rain. The beauty is it’s quick. It cools things off and it almost always empties out a park. We’ve watched the herd flock to the exit as soon as the afternoon storms roll in. That’s the time to throw on the old Mickey poncho and head in the opposite direction. Sure, some rides may have to close in the rain like Expedition Everest or Big Thunder Mountain, especially if there’s lightning spotted nearby, but the lines for a vast majority of the rides will be shortened as the masses run for cover out of the parks. Once the rainstorm is over, and they are almost always brief, you can shake out your Mickey poncho and have a quiet park to explore.


The Mickey ponchos are essential on every trip. Photo by Chris Barry.

The best tip we ever got in this vein of thought was from a cast member at Animal Kingdom’s Kilimanjaro Safari. Years ago we were back in Africa and about to head onto the safari line when it started to downpour. We asked her if the safari gets cancelled in the rain. She informed us that quite to the contrary, more of the animals came out in the rain to cool off, especially in the summer months, and that we’d probably see more than fauna during a rainstorm. She was spot-on correct. We saw more animals out and about that day than ever before and we stayed dry in the safari truck. Compare that to what all the people that ran out of the park at the sight of raindrops saw. It’s a no brainer. Stay put when it rains and wait it out and you might get an extra treat like we did that day and many other days since.

2 – Guests Don’t Use Fastpass Wisely

Fastpass, in my honest opinion, is the greatest recreational invention of all time. That’s a pretty strong statement for sure, but consider what Fastpass allows you to do. It says to you, “I know this ride/attraction is packed. Take this free ticket and come back later and you won’t have to wait in line! We’ll let you right in!” They had me at hello. There’s that moment when you come back with your pass and enter the Fastpass entrance…and you scurry past the masses in the standby line and you briefly feel… a little bad for them. After all, they’ve been waiting for an hour and you…well, let’s be honest…you haven’t. The guilt only lasts a moment because you realize that this service is there for everyone. It doesn’t cost anything more and everyone waiting in that line could have the same Fastpass that you have but for whatever reason, they didn’t or couldn’t get one.


Guests queue up for Winnie The Pooh and Little Mermaid Fastpass tickets. Photo by J. Jeff Kober.

So are people not utilizing Fastpass, or are there not enough Fastpass tickets to go around? In some cases like Toy Story Mania that’s obviously true. In other cases I’m not so sure. I’ve actually seen a 25-minute wait for Buzz Lightyear with a Fastpass return time only 30 minutes away. Why wait on that line? We got the Fastpass tickets, took a cold drink break and a nice leisurely spin around Tomorrowland on the PeopleMover, walked through Mickey’s Star Traders and then walked right onto Buzz with our passes and never waited on a line. I don’t think we were lucky. We were just wise with our Fastpass use.

This type of scenario has happened more so than not. We’ve used Fastpass incredibly well over the years. It’s saved us a ridiculous amount of time and aggravation. We’ve never waited in a Disney line for more than 30-40 minutes. That’s our max threshold. Either it’s Fastpass, a short wait, or we don’t ride at that time. We come back when it makes sense. I have no idea what Fastpass+ will bring for us. Only time will tell, but my guess is if we use it wisely, it will work in our favor as well.

1 – Guests Run Out of the Park Immediately at Closing

This one always amazes me. There’s nothing worse than walking along with the herd back down Main Street out to jam-packed bus, monorail or boat lines. That’s no way to end a magical day. Take your time. Soak up the atmosphere of the beautiful parks at night as they empty out. In the Magic Kingdom the cast members will start politely kicking you out of the various lands but they won’t kick you off of Main Street. Hang around for 30 minutes or more in The Emporium or out on the curb staring at the castle and watch everyone else hurrying up to wait. Then walk out to thin crowds and empty transportation.

Better yet, hang around World Showcase once Illuminations ends. Sitting around the waterfront talking, laughing or simply just staring out over the lagoon is a great way to wind down a day at glorious Epcot. We’ve walked around the Showcase from Germany, our favorite spot to watch the show, alone or just about alone all the way around the lagoon. Nobody rushes us…ever. It’s incredibly peaceful and satisfying and just about no one takes advantage of this moment. We head through MouseGear, the best shop on Disney property, and pick up a few treats or souvenirs. We just about have the store to ourselves. Then it’s a slow walk out underneath Spaceship Earth and past the fountain to an empty bus or monorail line. That’s how to end a day correctly in the most magical place on Earth, not fighting crowds and jockeying for a seat or at best a strap on a packed bus. The wait is always worth it. Let the herds go by and see just how wonderful a place the parks can be at night.


Don't leave after Illuminations. Stick around. Photo by Chris Barry.

My way isn’t the only right way. It’s the right way for me and for my family. If you disagree with what I’ve said above, that’s perfectly acceptable. However, I became the Walt Disney World fanatic that I am by letting the place in and not getting wrapped up in the madness. For some people, getting to the parks at noon and walking right into heat and crowds is the only way they experience things. They get there late. They run out as soon as the place closes. All they experience are crowds, heat, and over-stimulated kids. And they miss out on what Walt Disney World is really about.

It’s what the rest of us are crowing about on websites like MousePlanet. It drives us here to write, to read and to discuss with no lack of passion this magical place that we have all let into our hearts. They’re missing out on things and that’s why lists like these get created. So maybe someone will listen to my thoughts and opinions and the next time they venture down to the most popular travel destination in the world they can approach things a bit differently and see what all the fuss is really about.

What do you think? As usual I’d like to hear your thoughts on my list and some thoughts of your own. Click on the link below, let me hear what you have to say and I’ll see you next time with another Disney Top 5.

Comments

  1. By Buckimion

    Fatspass? I'll refrain from more jokes.

  2. By MajorMickey

    I agree. Fastpass is incredible. Especially now that you can set them up 60 days in advance. Our last trip we got to Epcot at opening, casually walked to the Land and down to the Sunshine Seasons. We were the only ones there. We got our breakfast and sat in a section completely alone watching the throngs of people coming down the stairs trying to get to Soarin. When we finished, we walked right onto the ride. No more breaking up the party as one of us had to run to get Fastpasses for the group. Same went for the Studios and Toy Story Mania. Years of experience and reading these sites with the great tips really pays off.

  3. By wwwdrich

    Of course, #2 only applies to the current FastPass system. With FastPass+, you can't get a "last-minute" FastPass, and you are limited to only 3 per day all in a single park.

  4. By BrandonH

    For a group with no children, a good mid-day break could be enjoying a sit-down restaurant. It's cool, well-themed, and you can just walk outside to get right back into things after the meal.

    Regarding staying behind at closing, my style differs from yours. If I'm getting to a park before opening or to an airport early the next day, I just want to get out of the park and to bed at closing. You almost always meet interesting people on the transportation back to the hotel, and it's fun to share stories of the day with them.

  5. By cbarry

    Quote Originally Posted by Buckimion View Post
    Fatspass? I'll refrain from more jokes.

    Thanks Buck. I must've gotten a little bleary eyed writing late at night. It's been corrected.

  6. By mkelm44

    Definitely agree with he take a break portion. Whether it's completely taking a break, or taking a long enough lunch and a sit somewhere quiet in the park (there are several quiet spots in any of the parks) is essential. Just sitting on a bench and watching the hustle and bustle can be fun and relaxing.

    Another mistake is a financial one, and it is not planning ahead for the little things. We all know about the big expenses- tickets, hotels, airfare- I'm talking about the 10 small things you buy every day at 4 or 5 bucks a pop. Bringing refillable water bottles, snacks, a raincoat (so you don't have to buy a poncho) and the like can save you a couple hundred bucks at then of a week long trip.

    Don't forget there is Disney stuff outside the parks. You don't have to go into the parks every single hour of every single day. We all love Disney (we wouldn't be here if we didn't) but there are other things to do in Disney World and Orlando in General. Admit it- the parks can be too much with so much going on- after a few days it's exhausting. Boat bay lake, tour the hotels, hang out by the pool, play miniature golf with the family, play a few rounds on one of the three golf courses, take a run, see a matinee at downtown Disney... Having that time away from the parks makes it easier to enjoy them when you're there

  7. By sasmmb

    Another mistake people make, related to item #5, is they think that if the park opens a 9:00 then that is when the parking lot opens. Or it's when the gates to the park itself open. Most people don't realize that you can get into the park itself before that time and be ahead of the game and the stated opening time is "rope drop" when the rope that prevents you from accessing the rest of the park is, well, dropped.

  8. By DwarfPlanet

    mkelm44 hit on something that we do all the time, add to #2 not just a mid-day break but also mid-week breaks. We usually get the 4 day military tickets but plan 6-7 days on being there not counting travel days. During that time we will take a break from the parks. Things we did last year was take the monorail all around the parks and stop at the different resorts to just look and shop. For the first time we rented a boston whaler out of the Polynesian and rode around the lake for an hour and a half. It was fun and relaxing. Plus visiting Downtown Disney. Or just simply relaxing at the pool.

  9. By DisneyGator

    These are great tips! My biggest problem is with #5. Being from CA, getting up at 7:30 to get the MK by 9 is like getting up at 4:30 my time. It's tough and usually takes us a few days before we can get to the park by 9:15.

    And I love the old fastpass system. We used it just like you. Grab a fastpass for a ride only 45 mintues from now, hit another ride or grab a dole whip, then walk right into the fastpass. And this reason alone is why I think Fastpass+ will royally suck! No impromptu fast passing - only 3 FPs a day. It will change my WDW experience, and NOT for the better.

    Finally, I love strolling out of the parks late. It's a lot easier to do when you don't have kids, but even with kids, it's so relaxing to wait just a little bit and have the park to ourselves.

  10. By cbarry

    Quote Originally Posted by MajorMickey View Post
    I agree. Fastpass is incredible. Especially now that you can set them up 60 days in advance. Our last trip we got to Epcot at opening, casually walked to the Land and down to the Sunshine Seasons. We were the only ones there. We got our breakfast and sat in a section completely alone watching the throngs of people coming down the stairs trying to get to Soarin. When we finished, we walked right onto the ride. No more breaking up the party as one of us had to run to get Fastpasses for the group. Same went for the Studios and Toy Story Mania. Years of experience and reading these sites with the great tips really pays off.

    I'm so curious how FastPass+ is going to work out for us. I guess I'll just have to plan a trip soon to check it out!
    Chris

  11. By cbarry

    Quote Originally Posted by BrandonH View Post
    For a group with no children, a good mid-day break could be enjoying a sit-down restaurant. It's cool, well-themed, and you can just walk outside to get right back into things after the meal.

    Regarding staying behind at closing, my style differs from yours. If I'm getting to a park before opening or to an airport early the next day, I just want to get out of the park and to bed at closing. You almost always meet interesting people on the transportation back to the hotel, and it's fun to share stories of the day with them.

    Hey Brandon,

    I do think a midday lunch is often overlooked. One of my favorites would be The Crystal Palace at Magic Kingdom. I do agree about meeting people on Disney Transportation. We've had some good conversations as well.

    Chris

  12. By cbarry

    Quote Originally Posted by mkelm44 View Post
    Definitely agree with he take a break portion. Whether it's completely taking a break, or taking a long enough lunch and a sit somewhere quiet in the park (there are several quiet spots in any of the parks) is essential. Just sitting on a bench and watching the hustle and bustle can be fun and relaxing.

    Another mistake is a financial one, and it is not planning ahead for the little things. We all know about the big expenses- tickets, hotels, airfare- I'm talking about the 10 small things you buy every day at 4 or 5 bucks a pop. Bringing refillable water bottles, snacks, a raincoat (so you don't have to buy a poncho) and the like can save you a couple hundred bucks at then of a week long trip.

    Don't forget there is Disney stuff outside the parks. You don't have to go into the parks every single hour of every single day. We all love Disney (we wouldn't be here if we didn't) but there are other things to do in Disney World and Orlando in General. Admit it- the parks can be too much with so much going on- after a few days it's exhausting. Boat bay lake, tour the hotels, hang out by the pool, play miniature golf with the family, play a few rounds on one of the three golf courses, take a run, see a matinee at downtown Disney... Having that time away from the parks makes it easier to enjoy them when you're there

    Great tips there mkelm44. We've had some fantastic times aside from the parks. Sometimes they're our favorite memories.

  13. By cbarry

    Quote Originally Posted by sasmmb View Post
    Another mistake people make, related to item #5, is they think that if the park opens a 9:00 then that is when the parking lot opens. Or it's when the gates to the park itself open. Most people don't realize that you can get into the park itself before that time and be ahead of the game and the stated opening time is "rope drop" when the rope that prevents you from accessing the rest of the park is, well, dropped.

    An excellent point and always one to remember.

  14. By cbarry

    Quote Originally Posted by DwarfPlanet View Post
    mkelm44 hit on something that we do all the time, add to #2 not just a mid-day break but also mid-week breaks. We usually get the 4 day military tickets but plan 6-7 days on being there not counting travel days. During that time we will take a break from the parks. Things we did last year was take the monorail all around the parks and stop at the different resorts to just look and shop. For the first time we rented a boston whaler out of the Polynesian and rode around the lake for an hour and a half. It was fun and relaxing. Plus visiting Downtown Disney. Or just simply relaxing at the pool.

    I have to admit...we've never taken a whole day away from the parks. We've done a lot of what you said outside of the parks as well, but then always seem to find ourselves back inside one way or another!

  15. By cbarry

    Quote Originally Posted by DisneyGator View Post
    These are great tips! My biggest problem is with #5. Being from CA, getting up at 7:30 to get the MK by 9 is like getting up at 4:30 my time. It's tough and usually takes us a few days before we can get to the park by 9:15.

    And I love the old fastpass system. We used it just like you. Grab a fastpass for a ride only 45 mintues from now, hit another ride or grab a dole whip, then walk right into the fastpass. And this reason alone is why I think Fastpass+ will royally suck! No impromptu fast passing - only 3 FPs a day. It will change my WDW experience, and NOT for the better.

    Finally, I love strolling out of the parks late. It's a lot easier to do when you don't have kids, but even with kids, it's so relaxing to wait just a little bit and have the park to ourselves.

    Hey Gator,

    Can't imagine WDW with jet lag. That must take a while to get used to.

    I'm trying to think if we actually have used more than 3 FastPasses in a given day...I'm sure we have, but it's probably not too common. We rarely need them in the morning hours. As I said above I am curious to see how it's going to work the next time we're down there. I don't like planning everything out in advance.

    There's nothing like World Showcase 30 minutes after Illuminations ends. It's amazing how empty it can get so quickly. It's always one of my favorite strolls.

  16. By davidgra

    I'd say there are different mistakes that are bigger than some of these.

    #1 - Not making advance dining reservations. Dining is a huge part of the fun of WDW, and a lot of people don't know (or don't bother) to make reservations well in advance.

    #2 - Not allowing for enough time or buying the right passes. A lot of people think four days is plenty for a WDW vacation, or they think they don't need the park hopping option. When we take first-timers with us, we generally encourage them to stay seven nights (eight days) and buy eight-day parkhoppers. You don't feel like you have to spend every waking minute in the park this way, and you have enough time to actually slow down and enjoy yourself. People who try to cram in all of WDW in four or five days end up exhausted and cranky, we've found.

    #3 - Not taking advantage of the "perks." If you're staying on property, use the Extra Magic Hours. Especially the evening ones. Use Disney Transportation to get to Downtown Disney, even if you have a rental car. Always ask if there's a discount for annual passholders, Disney Visa Card holders or DVC members (if you belong to any of them) -- you'd be surprised how many places offer discounts that you might not know about.

  17. By jimthedj

    Number 4 only applies if you are a resort guest going to the park in which you are closest to... and even then I personally don't recommend anyone doing it. (IMO)

    Especially, you are not staying on property, it makes no sense at all to leave. Two hours alone is travel time, "a break" you are describing is four hours or more for anyone off property at the least. If you did this at Animal Kingdom, they will be closed by the time you get back, Epcot & Hollywood Studios will only have a few hours left before closing and Hollywood studios ALL of the shows will have had their last showing. Only the Magic Kingdom when they are open very late can you really feasibly do this or Epcot if you are staying at one of the Epcot resorts and use the back entrance.

    It's very easy to take a break whichever park you are in. You can relaxing at the park your at watching entertainment, grabbing a bite, or people watching. Very easy to do, and even with kids there are many kid relaxing things at all the parks.

    All the parks except for Animal Kingdom take the entire day to see anyway, you are going to miss something. For the same reasons, I am not a fan of park hopping either for the same reasons of taking a break (i think you recommended that also in previous articles). Travel time between parks takes way to long counting walking to the entrance, waiting for the bus, tram, monorail, boat or a combination of them, you spend a large portion of your day in traveling time even if you are staying on property. Forget about it if you are not a resort guest and are driving between parks yourself.

  18. By letshavefun

    I have never been and number 5 was great. I would of never thought to go to another park that wasn't extra magic morning but it makes so much sense. We live in the Seattle area so rain wouldn't bother us it was nice to hear the park clears out in the rain. These tips are great for some one who has never been thank you.

  19. By danyoung

    Chris, I really liked this list. I'm completely with you on all items. I'd add one more -

    Don't jump in the first line you see at any attraction or quick serve restaurant. A lot of people don't realize that most cash registers at dining spots serve two sides. You can have 20 people lined up on one side, and no one at all on the other side. You might catch a few nasty looks by going right up to the register, but it's perfectly acceptable behavior. The same thing goes at attractions. Many times people will be lined up on the right when the left is wide open.

    It goes back to that "people are sheep" idea - if there's a line, people will tend to get in it. But a lot of the time there is an open lane that's very usable.

  20. By Klutch

    Quote Originally Posted by cbarry View Post
    Hey Brandon,

    I do think a midday lunch is often overlooked. One of my favorites would be The Crystal Palace at Magic Kingdom.

    Chris

    When I'm at Magic Kingdom, I like to ride the monorail over to the Grand Floridian and have lunch at the Grand Floridian Cafe. At lunch, that restaurant is cool, quiet and peaceful while all the in-park restaurants have a zoo-like atmosphere. The food at this restaurant is quite good and you can even get a beer. I didn't even need a reservation at lunch. Interestingly, the cost for lunch at this sit down restaurant isn't much more than lunch at a counter service place. Although, you will have to tip your server; well worth it for me and my family.

    It's been a few years since I have visited WDW. So, I'm not sure if the Grand Floridian Cafe is still open for lunch. If it is, go there for lunch!

    Another mistake people make at Disney parks is not doing any research about the attractions. People unfamiliar with Disney parks are typically accustomed to Six Flags parks where you can walk around and see every attraction. These people walk around a Disney Park and have no idea what's there. They often miss attractions simply because they don't know about them. One of my coworkers even told me, "Magic Kingdom is pretty much a walk-around park; not many rides at all other than Dumbo and the tea cups." He couldn't see the other attractions so he didn't know they were there!

    Not having any kind of plan is also a mistake. I often see people stopped in the middle of a walkway with an open map saying, "What do you want to do now?". Have a plan! You don't have to stick to it. But it sure is nice to follow it when you don't have any other ideas.

  21. By cbarry

    Quote Originally Posted by Klutch View Post
    When I'm at Magic Kingdom, I like to ride the monorail over to the Grand Floridian and have lunch at the Grand Floridian Cafe. At lunch, that restaurant is cool, quiet and peaceful while all the in-park restaurants have a zoo-like atmosphere. The food at this restaurant is quite good and you can even get a beer. I didn't even need a reservation at lunch. Interestingly, the cost for lunch at this sit down restaurant isn't much more than lunch at a counter service place. Although, you will have to tip your server; well worth it for me and my family.

    It's been a few years since I have visited WDW. So, I'm not sure if the Grand Floridian Cafe is still open for lunch. If it is, go there for lunch!

    Another mistake people make at Disney parks is not doing any research about the attractions. People unfamiliar with Disney parks are typically accustomed to Six Flags parks where you can walk around and see every attraction. These people walk around a Disney Park and have no idea what's there. They often miss attractions simply because they don't know about them. One of my coworkers even told me, "Magic Kingdom is pretty much a walk-around park; not many rides at all other than Dumbo and the tea cups." He couldn't see the other attractions so he didn't know they were there!

    Not having any kind of plan is also a mistake. I often see people stopped in the middle of a walkway with an open map saying, "What do you want to do now?". Have a plan! You don't have to stick to it. But it sure is nice to follow it when you don't have any other ideas.

    Hey Klutch,

    The monorail escape is a great lunch option. You don't even have to go to the sit down restaurants at the resorts. The counter service at each monorail hotel is just fine especially for lunch.

    We've been to the Grand Floridian Cafe twice for dinner and both times we loved it. It wasn't crowded at all and the food was delicious. We walked over from the Polynesian once and the other time, we monorailed it over from Epcot, had dinner and then hopped back onto the monorail for a evening at the Magic Kingdom. A great, often overlooked dining option. The Shrimp and Grits and the Grilled Pork Chops are excellent. They are indeed still open for lunch.

    Interesting observation on people missing things in a Disney Park. I think you're absolutely right. Imagine missing Haunted Mansion or Pirates because they "don't look like a ride" from the outside.

    Chris

  22. By cbarry

    Quote Originally Posted by danyoung View Post
    Chris, I really liked this list. I'm completely with you on all items. I'd add one more -

    Don't jump in the first line you see at any attraction or quick serve restaurant. A lot of people don't realize that most cash registers at dining spots serve two sides. You can have 20 people lined up on one side, and no one at all on the other side. You might catch a few nasty looks by going right up to the register, but it's perfectly acceptable behavior. The same thing goes at attractions. Many times people will be lined up on the right when the left is wide open.

    It goes back to that "people are sheep" idea - if there's a line, people will tend to get in it. But a lot of the time there is an open lane that's very usable.

    Thanks Dan. There we go agreeing again!

    I've had that happen so many times at Disney counter service restaurants. People go where the masses go.

  23. By cbarry

    Quote Originally Posted by letshavefun View Post
    I have never been and number 5 was great. I would of never thought to go to another park that wasn't extra magic morning but it makes so much sense. We live in the Seattle area so rain wouldn't bother us it was nice to hear the park clears out in the rain. These tips are great for some one who has never been thank you.

    Maybe I shouldn't be posting a tip like this! I'd like to keep the non-Magic Hour Parks quiet! I'm kind of banking on the masses not heeding my advice.

  24. By letshavefun

    Quote Originally Posted by cbarry View Post
    Maybe I shouldn't be posting a tip like this! I'd like to keep the non-Magic Hour Parks quiet! I'm kind of banking on the masses not heeding my advice.

    Too late I'll remember this But I totally know what you mean. There's a hotel at Disneyland that was always questionable to lots of people but I loved it and would give it rave reviews. Now it has gone up so much in price I don't stay there anymore.

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